Listen Now
Pledge Now


 
 

Superior National Forest Update November 24, 2017

National Forest Update – November 23, 2017.

Hi.  I’m Tom McCann, resource information specialist, with this week’s National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the east end of the Superior.  With the change of season, we’re changing this program to air only every other week until spring.  Here’s what’s happening these next two weeks.

With the advent of winter comes winter driving.  With temperatures right around freezing, we can have some hazardous icy conditions out on the roads.  You might be in a clear area where the warm sun keeps the road above freezing, then go over a hill or hit a shady patch, and suddenly the road is covered in ice, or just hit that time of day when the day’s puddles become the night’s ice rink.  Watch out, and leave plenty of following distance between you and the car ahead.

There are plenty of good reasons to get out though, despite the possible ice.  One is that it is again the season for holiday greenery!  Permits for Christmas trees are only five dollars, and they smell so much better than the artificial variety.  Balsam firs make for fragrant long lasting Christmas trees, and in many places their removal might actually help the forest ecosystem.  Know your trees though, it is illegal to cut white pine or cedar with a Christmas tree permit, and while it is legal to cut a spruce, they lose their needles in a hurry.  If you have a child in fourth grade, they are eligible this year for a free permit through the “Every Kid In A Park” program.  Visit “Every Kid In A Park” online and register - full details and links can be found on the Superior’s website. You may also wish to harvest balsam boughs for making wreaths.  A personal use permit for making up to five wreaths is available for $20.  Princess pine, a small pine tree shaped club moss often used to decorate wreaths, may not be harvested on the Superior.

For full details on harvesting balsam boughs or Christmas trees, refer to our Holiday Greenery flyer, or our Holiday Greenery web page.   You’ll find lots of identification info as well as the rules and guidelines on harvesting.

If you’ve eaten too much turkey, and would like to start on your New Year’s resolution to exercise ahead of time, you’ll be interested to know that the Superior National Forest, in partnership with local trail partners, has decided to open limited sections of the trails at the Norpine and Flathorn/ Gegoka Trail Systems to dual use of fat tire biking and cross country skiing.  These sections of trail, in addition to single track bike trails at Pincushion, are now open to fat tire cyclists.  Visitors who are interested in fat tire biking opportunities on the Norpine Ski Trail System or at Pincushion should check the Visit Cook County website for current trail conditions and opportunities.  Cyclists who are interested in exploring the trails at Flathorn/ Gegoka should contact National Forest Lodge in Isabella for trail conditions and information.  Links to both websites can be found in the Current Conditions box for those trails on our website.

As a reminder, this dual use is being authorized in partnership with area ski and cycling associations and it is our hope that the use of fat tire bikes will not detract from the skiing experience.  Cyclists are reminded that bikers should always yield to skiers and they should only use the portions of trail which are not tracked for skiing.

Speaking of dual use, logging truck traffic is lighter this week.  Winter hauling on Gunflint is taking place on the following roads: Firebox Road, Blueberry Road, Greenwood Road, Shoe Lake Road, Forest Road 1385, and the Gunflint Trail.   Tofte logging traffic will be on the Pancore Road, Sawbill Trail, the 4 Mile Grade, Trappers Lake Road, Temperance River Road, and the Wanless Road.  Remember that if a small road looks plowed, there is a good chance it is being used to haul on. 

Whether you hit the trails on a fat tire bike, or go off in search of the perfect tree for your living room, get out and enjoy our winter.  It beats sitting at home waiting for spring, because it will be a long wait!  Until next time, this has been Tom McCann with the National Forest Update.
 

Listen: