West End News: October 4

Alton Lake at the rise of the full moon.
Alton Lake at the rise of the full moon.

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It was a golden week in the West End – in more ways than one.  The weather was nearly perfect and the colors were at their peak.  As a result, there was a perfect storm of tourism as people flocked to the area for the beauty, hospitality and culture. 
 
All of the events that happened in the West End last week came off with no hitches and all had good attendance.  The Birch Grove Community Center celebration was very well attended and Birch Grove Foundationa Director Patty Nordahl wants me to thank everyone 0n her behalf.  She singled out Matt Kartes, Bill Huggins, Eric Frost, Doug Nordahl and James Coleman for their hard work getting the new wood-fired bread and pizza oven finished and cured in time for the ribbon cutting.  She also thanks Roger Michaelson for cutting the ribbon on the oven, a memorial to his wife Muriel, and Ginny Storlie, who cut the ribbon on the new skating rink and warming house, dedicated in memory of her husband Derald.  Finally, Patty gives special thanks to all the volunteers who got the playground installed.  A couple of former Birch Grove students commented that they would like to re-enroll in elementary school, just so they could enjoy the new playground and tennis court!
 
Patty is also gauging interest in the possibility of a beginning T’ai Chi class at Birch Grove.  Give Patty a call at 663-7977 if you are interested.  Patty also mentioned that several classes are being considered for exploring the various uses of the wood-fired oven.  Let Patty know what your ideas are for the oven – whether as a student, or an instructor.
 
The Sawtooth Mountain Clinic office at Birch Grove will be open one day a week throughout October.  Call 387-2330 for appointments.
 
Before we leave Birch Grove, mark your calendar for Zoar Church’s annual Lutefisk Supper, scheduled for Saturday, November 10th at Birch Grove.  This is a time-tested community event with deep cultural roots that run all the way back to Scandinavia.
 
Another long-standing community event is the North Shore Health Care Foundation Golf Tournament, held at Superior National in Lutsen, on Sunday, October 7.  The traditional 19th hole reception will once again be hosted by the ever-generous Lutsen Resort.  As always, be there, or be square.  You can find details at the North Shore Health Care Foundation website.
 
There are two really cool historical presentations coming up. Cook County Higher Education is collaborating with the Cook County Historical Society to bring up Todd Lindahl, from Two Harbors, who will present “Passenger Boats of the North Shore” on Thursday, October 18, from 7 – 8:30 p.m. at the North Shore Campus in Grand Marais.  I know Todd and he is an interesting and entertaining expert on North Shore history.  Call 387-3411 if you have questions.  Of course, treats are provided.
 
The second historical gathering is the annual story telling dinner, sponsored by the North Shore Fishing Museum in Tofte and held at Lutsen Resort.  This year the event will feature Adolph Ojard, who is Executive Director of the Seaway Port Authority in Duluth.  Adolph is a Knife River native, who grew up commercial fishing with his grandfather on Lake Superior.  His mother is Marion Torgerson, from the Isle Royale Torgersons.  December 1st is the date and reservations can be made by calling Lutsen Resort at 663-7212.
 
Almost every party returning from the BWCA Wilderness last week reported hearing wolves howl.  We’ve heard them almost every night here at Sawbill as well.  One couple from Michigan heard the wolves howl so close to their campsite, that they were also able to hear the brush rustle as the pack passed by and the sound of them lapping up water from the lake. 
 
Hearing wolves and seeing their sign is one of the signature experiences that draw people to the forest and wilderness.  Sadly, many wolves will be killed next month when the wolf hunting and trapping season begins again after many years of wolves being strictly protected.  I have no objection to hunting or trapping, but I feel strongly that the wolves have more economic value to the local community when they are alive, rather than as a trophy in someone’s den.
 
I always enjoy asking our outfitting guests about what they do for a living.  At an outfitter, it is nearly impossible to guess what people do by looking at them.  One customer, a few years ago, was returning from her trip and was extremely dirty.  Her clothes were filthy, her face was covered with soot and, frankly, she smelled bad.  She was an interesting conversationalist, so I asked her what she did for a living.  She informed me that she was a federal judge.  I was surprised and did a little double take.  She caught it and said, “Does it surprise you that a woman is a federal judge?”  “No”, I replied, “It surprises me that someone so dirty is a federal judge.”  She laughed and said, “You should see me in my robes!”
 
This spring, we had a customer who is an accomplished and well-known trumpet player.  Last week, we had a customer who is an accomplished and well-known trumpet maker.  Besides being genuinely interesting people to meet, I was able to connect them as friends on Facebook and who knows what beautiful music might be the result.  It’s a small world here in the West End.

Photo by Tom Spence, Tofte. 


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