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Superior National Forest Update



Contributor(s): 
USDA Forest Service

The Superior National Forest Update helps you keep up to date with Forest activities that you might encounter while driving, boating, or hiking in the Superior National Forest’s Tofte and Gunflint Ranger Districts.  It includes road and fire conditions, logging and other truck activities, as well as naturalist programs and special events.  

The USDA Forest Service has more information on the Superior National Forest website.


What's On:

Superior National Forest Update

Hi.  I’m Renee Frahm, administration assistant, with this week’s National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the east end of the Superior. Here’s what’s happening for the week of September 21st.

This week marks the official start to fall – the autumnal equinox.  From here on in, days will be shorter than nights.  These days around the equinox are also when day length changes the fastest, so if it seems like today was a lot shorter than yesterday, you are right.  We are losing about three minutes of daylight every day right now.  By the end of the month, our days will be shorter by about half an hour than they are now.

On the plus side, that gives us some really wonderful chances to see the night sky.  People are becoming more interested in dark skies and controlling light pollution.  We are lucky to have some of the darkest skies around up here and some of the clearest air as well.  Those two factors combined allow us to see the Milky Way plainly every clear night, and enjoy the aurora when it happens.  Dark skies and clear air are two things that you can help control.  Minimize yard lighting, and use “on/off” or motion control switches instead of having lights that stay on from sunset to sundown.  Use shades on outdoor lights, and point them down instead of into the air.  If you use lighting on outdoor advertising, point the lamps down at the sign instead of up at the sign.  Clear air of course corresponds to clean air, so any action you can take to reduce pollution will help with our starry skies.  This is a good time of year to check furnaces to make sure they are operating efficiently and not polluting.  If you heat with wood, tend your fire so that it is burning well and with minimal smoke.

While astronomy tells us that it is just the start of fall, the forest tells us that it has been fall for a couple of weeks now.  Fall colors are progressing rapidly across the forest, but may not last long as there is a lot of rain and wind in the forecast.  There are a lot of drivers out right now, so watch out for vehicles and make sure you are driving and parking in a safe and respectful manner.  Grouse season has begun, so whether or not you are hunting, you need to be sporting your orange.  I’ve heard it’s the new black.  If you are hunting, be extra aware of firearm safety and what is down range as there are plenty of other people out in the woods.  Remember, it is against the law to discharge a firearm from a vehicle, across a road, or within 150 yards of a recreation site, building, campsite, or residence.  There are several sets of hunter walking trails on the Tofte and Gunflint Districts where we maintain grouse habitat.  For locations and trail maps, see our website under Hunting, or visit a district office. 

Fall logging continues as well.  On the Gunflint District, look out for trucks on Firebox Road, Blueberry Road, Greenwood Road, Shoe Lake Road, Forest Road 1385, the Gunflint Trail, South Brule Road, the Lima Grade, Trestle Pine Road, Ball Club Road, Devil Track Road, Cook County 6 and 7, and Bally Creek Road.  On the Tofte District there will be hauling on Dumbell River Road, Wanless Road, Pancore Road, the Sawbill Trail, Clara Lake Rd, and the Caribou Trail.

Whether you are hunting for grouse, fall colors, or the Milky Way, fall is a great season to get outside.  Enjoy the Forest, and until next week, this is Renee Frahm with the National Forest Update.
 

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Superior National Forest Update: September 15

Hi. I’m Cathy Jasperson, customer service representative at the Tofte office with this week’s National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the east end of the Superior. Here’s what’s happening for the week of September 14.

As you head out into the Forest this coming week, you may encounter a lot of traffic. A “lot of traffic” here isn’t exactly a “Chicago rush hour,” but it will be enough that you’ll have to keep your eyes open and be ready for other vehicles on the road. One source of traffic will be the fall color season. Colors are really ramping up right now, and the Forest Service is getting a lot of inquiries on when the peak of fall color will be. This coming weekend should be a pretty good one for fall color in some areas, although there are plenty of other areas which still are hanging on to summer. Differences are due to variations in microclimate where even the south side of a hill can have a different climate than the north side. The differences are also due to the individual tree: Stressed trees usually change color sooner than completely healthy trees. Does that mean you should worry about the birch in your yard if it turns early? Not necessarily, but you may want to investigate what could be stressing it and see if there is something you could do. Overall, this should be a good year for fall colors. Fall colors could be the silver lining of our somewhat cloudy and rainy summer. If you are driving looking at colors, please respect other drivers and let them pass if they want, and park where it is safe to do so. 

The other source of traffic will be some logging trucks. There are several active sales right now, and there are many roads which will be hosting truck traffic. On the Gunflint District, look out for trucks on Firebox Road, Blueberry Road, Greenwood Road, Shoe Lake Road, Forest Road 1385, the Gunflint Trail, South Brule Road, the Lima Grade, Trestle Pine Road, Ball Club Road, Devil Track Road, Cook County 6 and 7, and Bally Creek Road. On the Tofte District there will be hauling on Dumbbell River Road, Wanless Road, Pancore Road, the Sawbill Trail, Clara Lake Road, and the Caribou Trail.

Added to that, there also may be vehicles from hunters parked along the roads. The bear season is active right now, and small game and grouse seasons both start on September 16. If you plan on hiking in the woods, this is the time to start wearing orange. 

All that makes it sound like a very busy season, which it is in some regards. This is the time of year though that we see use drop in the Boundary Waters and on other lakes. Boaters and canoeists need to be aware that you are less likely see other people, and you need to be prepared to be self-sufficient in an emergency. Carry a spare prop and paddles in your boat, and bring supplies enough to last a night, just in case. Make sure your trailer has a spare tire and that it is functional, and that you have the right size wrench along to put it on. Let people know where you are going and when you will return. If you’re canoe camping, make sure you are equipped for spending a day sitting out storms or wind. We may not get hurricanes up here, but fall winds can certainly bring conditions not suitable for canoeing.

Despite all those warnings and traffic, this is one of the best times to get out and enjoy the Forest. Bugs are low, temperatures are nice, and the scenery can be spectacular. 

Have a great week in the woods, and until next week, this has been Cathy Jasperson with the Superior National Forest Update.
 

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Superior National Forest Update: September 8

Hi. I’m Steve Robertsen, Superior National Forest interpretation and education specialist, with this week’s National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the east end of the Superior. Here’s what’s happening for the week of September 8.

It’s hard to believe that summer is gone and autumn is here. Two sure signs are that the kids are back in school, and our fall color reports and photos have reappeared on our webpage. Our reports are not just the percentage of color and predictions on when the peak of color will be, but also include some musings on autumn and fall illustrated with photos from around the Forest. Check it out if you haven’t. 

Fall migrations are in full swing. There is a lot of bird activity, and it is good time to keep the feeders full as birds need the food to fuel their travels. Hummingbirds are still around, so keep those feeders full and clean as well. If you go out on a nice still, clear night you’ll be able to hear migrating flocks of birds chirping to each other as they navigate using the stars. 

There’s a bit of human migration happening this weekend as well. The annual Superior Fall Trail Race will be taking place on the Superior Hiking Trail this Friday and Saturday. If you’re looking to go for a hike, you may want to visit their website to find out where racers may be on the trail. Watch for people, spectators and racers at trail crossings, and take note of temporary ‘no parking’ areas in some locations. Running 100 miles, or even 50 or 26, on a hiking trail is a pretty incredible feat so best of luck to all the participants.

Bear season has begun, so there will be bear hunters out in the woods as well as the runners. Look out for both hunters and bait stations, and try not to disturb either. With small game season opening soon as well, it is a good time to start wearing your orange hat or vest when out and about. Our black dog always sports an orange vest of his own this time of year.

Speaking of bears, they are in their final fattening up stage before hibernation. They love fat-rich acorns right now, but are also happy to eat any human food they discover. Take your bird feeders in at night, close your garage doors, and safely store all your food and garbage when camping. Our fee campgrounds have dumpsters, but they don’t work unless the bars or chains are secure. In at least one campground, the bears have figured out the bar system, so there are additional pins through the bar to secure it in place. Make sure you secure the dumpster as much as possible when you are done using it.

There’s a fair amount of truck traffic happening out in the woods. On the Tofte District, there will be trucks using the Clara Lake Road, the Caribou Trail, the Dumbbell River Road and the Wanless Road. On the Gunflint District, look for trucks on the Firebox Road, Blueberry Road, Greenwood Road, Shoe Lake Road, Forest Road 1385, the Gunflint Trail, the South Brule Road, the Lima Grade, the Trestle Pine Road, and, finally, the Ball Club Road.

Those trucks will be competing with the first of the leaf watchers. Expect to see slow moving and parked vehicles over the next couple of months when people come to look at and take pictures of the fall foliage. And, if you are one of those people, make sure to park in safe places and close the doors of your car when you get out. Pull over in safe areas to let faster moving cars pass you.

Enjoy the beginning of fall, and until next week, this has been Steve Robertsen with the National Forest Update.
 

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Superior National Forest Update: September 1

Hi. I’m Renee Frahm, Information Specialist for the Tofte and Gunflint Ranger Districts with this week’s National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the east end of the Superior. Here’s what’s happening for the week of August 28.

We are coming into the beginning of fall where some days still feel warm enough for a swim, and yet there have been a few frosty mornings already. With Labor Day weekend upon us, school starting for some students, and the Minnesota State Fair underway, we are noticing a slight dip in our use of recreation sites across the Forest although the tinge of yellow and orange starting to peak out throughout the woods is a sign that it won’t be long until leaf peepers will be out cruising the backroads.  

Even though rain has still been keeping fire danger to a minimum, it’s important to remember that whatever the conditions are, you need to be careful with fires and make sure every fire you light is totally out when you leave. Within the last week Forest Service fire fighters were dispatched from the Tofte and Gunflint Ranger Districts to extinguish two unattended campfires. Please, be careful with your campfires and make sure they are dead and out before leaving them unattended!
Speaking of fires, wildfires continue to be numerous in the western part of the United States. The Superior National Forest has been supporting suppression efforts for several weeks now. At the moment, there are over 50 employees from the Forest working on fires in several states including Oregon, Idaho and Montana. Yesterday our two offices had quite a few calls regarding the smell of smoke in the air. That smoke was actually coming from fires out west and in Canada.

If you are out driving in the Forest this week, there’s a number of roads which will see logging traffic. On the Tofte District, watch for trucks on Lake County 705, Cook County 33, the Dumbell Road, Perent Lake Road, the Wanless, Sawbill Trail, Fourmile Grade, Clara Lake Road and the Grade. On the Gunflint District hauling is taking place on the Firebox Road, Blueberry Road, Greenwood Road, Shoe Lake Road, and Forest Road 1385. There will also be trucks on the Gunflint Trail, South Brule Road, Lima Grade, Trestle Pine Road, Ball Club Road, Devil Track Road, Cook County 6 and 7, and the Bally Creek Road. With Labor Day weekend upon us, there is likely to be an increase in traffic on the back roads in general. Keep an eye out for bicyclists, hikers, OHVs and wildlife. 

If you venture off of the Forest roads you’re likely to notice some of the work being done by employees, volunteers and partners like the Conservation Corps of Minnesota who recently helped build a new fish barrier at Hogback Lake. The new and improved barrier aims to keep unwanted fish out while promoting the trout fishery. 

The Northwoods Volunteer Connection is coordinating an effort this Sunday, September 3, to install a new boardwalk on a popular section of the Superior Hiking Trail near LeVeaux Mountain. If you’re interested in helping out you can find out more online at mnnvc.org. 

The Superior Cycling Association has had a very busy and productive summer maintaining the single track mountain bike trails at Britton Peak and Pincushion Mountain. The group has installed several sections of new boardwalk and rock armoring to help protect the trails while also enhancing the ride. If you’re interested in helping out with mountain bike trails visit SCA’s website at superiorcycling.org. 

Have a safe and wonderful Labor Day weekend, enjoy your family and friends, and get in on some outdoor family fun before your kids head back to school next Tuesday! Until next week, this has been Renee Frahm with the National Forest Update.
 

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Superior National Forest Update: August 18

Hi.  I’m Amy Wilfahrt, fisheries biologist for the Tofte and Gunflint Ranger Districts with this week’s National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the east end of the Superior. Here’s what’s happening for the week of August 18.

We are coming into the end of summer where some days feel hot enough for a swim, and some require looking in the closet for that jacket that was put away in the spring.  One of the markers of the season is the fireweed plant.  Most of us are familiar with the spikes of purple blossoms along roadsides and other disturbed areas.  The blossoms start at the bottom and work their way up the spike as time goes on, and the story is that when the flowers reach the top and end, summer is over.  I hate to say it, but they are nearing the top.

Rain has still been keeping fire danger to a minimum, though it is actually high in other parts of the state.  Remember that whatever the conditions are, you need to be careful with fires and make sure every fire you light is totally out when you leave.

One prominent fire which will be out this week is the sun during the eclipse.  It would be amazing if you haven’t heard that there is going to be an eclipse on the 21st, but since this is a once in a lifetime event for some people, we just want to be sure you don’t miss it.  From the point of view of the Superior, the moon won’t completely block the sun, but it will block enough to be noticeable.   Be sure to not look directly at the sun, use proper eye protection, or look at a projected image.  It is predicted to start at 11:46, reach a maximum at 1:07, and end at 2:27.  Don’t miss it!

If you are out driving in the Forest this week looking for that perfect eclipse viewing spot, there’s a number of roads which will see logging traffic.  On the Tofte District, watch for trucks on Lake County 705, Cook County 33, The Grade, and the Sawbill Trail.  On the Gunflint District hauling is taking place on the Firebox Road, Blueberry Road, Greenwood Road, Shoe Lake Road, and Forest Road 1385.  There will also be trucks on the Gunflint Trail, South Brule Road, Lima Grade, Trestle Pine Road, Ball Club Road, Devil Track Road, Cook County 6 and 7, and the Bally Creek Road.

You may also get to see the start of some of the fall migrations.  You’ll notice that geese are gathering in larger groups, and if you happen to be near an abandoned chimney at dusk, you may see small insect eating chimney swifts diving into the chimney to roost through the night.  By the end of the month, these little mosquito eaters will have headed south to South America.  Other birds, such as warblers, who were here for the insects and to raise families, are also starting to move through.  It is not uncommon at night to hear the call notes of high flying groups of small birds headed south.

Moose and deer don’t migrate, but this is a great time to spot them along the roadsides with the bucks and bulls antlers in full velvet.  I think they are at their most photogenic this time of year, but be careful if you stop to take a picture.

Don’t miss the eclipse, but also don’t miss the last of the warm sun of summer.  Until next week, this has been Amy Wilfahrt with the National Forest Update.
 

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Superior National Forest Update: August 11

Hi.  I’m Frances Meger, seasonal naturalist with the Superior National Forest with the National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the east end of the Superior. Here’s what’s happening for the week of August 11.

This weekend is the peak of the annual Perseid meteor shower. Meteor showers are caused when the Earth moves into the debris left behind in the path of a comet. The comet in this case is called Swift Tuttle, and it seems to leave a lot of debris behind it, making for lots of meteors as the bits and pieces of old comet burn up in the Earth’s atmosphere. How many?  It varies from year to year, but the Perseids can have as many as 100 meteors per hour. It’s usually best to watch for meteors after midnight, but the moon will be rising around 11:00, so the best viewing might be right before moonrise. Northern Minnesota and the Superior National Forest are known as areas with very little in the way of light pollution and spectacular views of the night sky, so, grab a lawn chair where you can lean back, put on plenty of bug dope, and get set to watch the show.

The frequent rains have kept fire danger low all season this year, a fact which Smokey Bear liked while he celebrated his 73rd birthday this past week. On the west end of the Forest, Smokey’s friends, our fire crews, are doing some prescribed burning, and there are a few burns planned for our east end as well. Keep an eye on our website, or follow us on Facebook and Twitter, and we’ll keep you informed as to when and where those burns will be taking place as we try to fit them in between rain showers. 
 
There are only a couple of weeks remaining of summer naturalist programs, sponsored by Visit Cook County. Mike Zemaitis and I would like to thank everyone who has come to our programs this year, and invite everyone to join us by the campfire for one of the remaining presentations. You can find the schedule online, at the visitor center in Grand Marais, at Forest Service offices, or at any of the participating resorts.

If you are out driving in the Forest this week, there’s a number of roads which will see logging traffic. On the Tofte District, watch for trucks on Lake County 705, Cook County 33, The Grade, and the Sawbill Trail. On the Gunflint District hauling is taking place on the Firebox Road, Blueberry Road, Greenwood Road, Shoe Lake Road, and Forest Road 1385. There will also be trucks on the Gunflint Trail, South Brule Road, Lima Grade, Trestle Pine Road, Ball Club Road, Devil Track Road, Cook County 6 and 7, and the Bally Creek Road.

Enjoy the meteor showers, or have a s’more at the campfire, or why not do both? Until next week, this has been Frances Meger with the National Forest Update.
 

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Superior National Forest Update: August 4

The Superior National Forest Update helps you keep up to date with Forest activities that you might encounter while driving, boating, or hiking in the Superior National Forest’s Tofte and Gunflint Ranger Districts. 

Here's the weekly report from Kyle Stover.

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Superior National Forest Update: July 28

Hi. I’m Steve Robertsen, education and interpretation specialist with the Superior National Forest with the National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the east end of the Superior. Here’s what’s happening for the week of July 28.

There’s a lot of activity in the Forest this time of year, and this past Wednesday some of that activity was what is called a Bioblitz. A Bioblitz is a single day devoted to recording all the living things in a certain area, and has been described as a biology nerd-fest! Bioblitzes happen across the country on different days, and help us to understand the complex web of life which covers our planet. The Bioblitz in which our Forest Service biologists took part happens annually at Wolf Ridge Environmental Learning Center, right next door to the Forest. Participants in this year’s effort included many volunteers - even groups of school age kids from the Twin Cities! All these people searched for plants, birds, insects, mammals, and everything else they could find. By the time they were done, the Bioblitz had recorded over 450 different kinds of life, showing just how rich North Shore nature is.

One aspect of biology which seems to be particularly abundant right now are the insects. Black fly numbers are lower than they were earlier in the year, but it seems to be prime time for butterflies, dragonflies, grasshoppers, and other insects. Many of these are insects which spent the early part of summer as immature nymphs and larvae, and are now flying adults. The adults are searching for mates, and will lay eggs which will either overwinter and hatch in the spring, or hatch now and produce young which will overwinter. For many of our insects, life as an adult is short and most will die with the coming of cold weather. Unfortunately, in their hunt for a mate, a lot of these adults choose to fly over roads which means this is a good time of year to check the washer fluid level in your vehicle - I removed a dozen dragonflies from the grill just from one trip down Hwy 61 in the evening.

Dragonflies aren’t the only thing to watch for while out driving. You should be on the lookout for logging trucks in the following areas. On the Tofte District, there will be logging traffic on Lake County 705, Cook County 33, and the Grade. On Gunflint, hauling is taking place on Greenwood Road, Firebox Road, Shoe Lake Road, Gunflint Trail, Forest Road 1385, Trestle Pine Road, South Brule Road, Lima Grade, and Cook County 6. Additionally, starting this week, there will be trucks on the Bally Creek Road south of Devil Track Lake and Cook County 7. 

Like the insects, you should take advantage of the summer weather to get outside. Explore the Forest, or do your own Bioblitz in your backyard with your family. You’d be amazed at how many living things you share your yard with. 

Until next week, this has been Steve Robertsen with the National Forest Update.
 
 

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Superior National Forest Update: July 21

Hi.  I’m Paulette Anholm, information receptionist at both the Tofte and Gunflint offices with the National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the east end of the Superior National Forest. Here’s what’s happening for the week of July 22.

We are hitting what is normally the hottest part of the summer. While the north may be the coolest part of the state, it is still hot enough to think about staying hydrated when you’re outside. Usually we think the best thing to do is to drink plenty of water, but a recent study which looked at how long liquid stays in your body showed some interesting alternative beverages. Milk actually had one of the best hydration indices, possibly because it is absorbed over a longer period of time. Commercial hydration solution used medically also, not surprisingly, had a high hydration index. The surprise, and good news for fans of iced lattes, is that coffee turns out to have just as good a hydration index as water. While studies like this are interesting to think about and make for good conversation, the main thing is that any liquid is better than none, and you need plenty of liquid if you are sweating on a hot day. 

It may be getting hot in the future, but our recent cool wet weather seems to have spurred more campers in and out of the Boundary Waters to want a nice warm campfire. We’ve seen an increase of people cutting live vegetation, possibly in hopes of fueling those fires. Cutting live trees is not allowed, and could result in a pretty good-sized fine, but the real reason not to cut live vegetation is just that it is a bad idea. In the first place, part of our wilderness ethic is to leave no trace of ourselves behind when we depart, and a noticeable stump or cut branch is certainly a big visible trace that you were there. Second, branches harvested off live trees make lousy fires anyway. Green wood does not burn well. You might think the solution would be cutting branches off dead trees, but that still is leaving a trace. Here’s what you should do instead. In the wilderness, gather dead and down wood from somewhere away from your campsite. Don’t remove branches from beaver dams or lodges. Pick wood that is wrist size or smaller as burning large logs are hard to extinguish and may continue to smolder after you leave.

At campgrounds, buy local certified firewood, and bring an axe or other tool to cut some of that firewood into kindling size. Never use waste paper to start a fire. Disposal of trash in fires is illegal, plus burning food saturated paper plates will make your fire pit smell like lunch to passing bears, and they will come and dig it up. Finally, when you are done with the fire, make sure it is totally out and cold to the touch. Smokey Bear has been saying this for years, but it is still true that many of our wildfires are caused accidentally by humans, and “only you can prevent wildfires.”

Speaking of fires, our fire danger is still pretty low due to the rain. Our fire crews are mostly out west helping with wildfires in other parts of the country.  In addition to keeping the fire danger low, the rain has kept our roads soggy. Keep an eye on road conditions when you drive. We’ve had a few of our rigs get stuck recently due to muddy soft roadways. 
There will be some logging trucks out on those roads as well. On the Tofte side, there will be logging traffic on Lake County 705, Cook County 33, and the Grade. On the Gunflint, hauling is taking place on Greenwood Road, Firebox Road, Shoe Lake Road, Gunflint Trail, Forest Road 1385, Trestle Pine Road, South Brule Road, Lima Grade, and Cook County 6.

Logging trucks on roads are big and easily seen, but it may be harder to see small stuff, like butterflies. The northern blue butterfly is a little blue butterfly and is a species we are watching on the Forest. They like to ‘puddle,’ gathering in groups on roads where there is animal scat or some other concentration of certain nutrients. If you see northern blues, or any other kinds of butterflies on the road in an area where you can slow down safely, give them a break and let them fly off instead of becoming ornaments on your radiator.

Enjoy the butterfly watching, and think about escaping the heat with a trip to woods this week. Until next week, this has been Paulette Anholm with the Superior National Forest Update.
 

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Superior National Forest Update: July 14

Hi. I’m Joe Mundell, timber sale administrator on the Gunflint with the National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the Tofte and Gunflint Districts of the Superior National Forest. Here’s what’s happening in the woods for the week of July 14.

Rain! Rain is what seems to be happening in the woods recently. Duluth is at 4 inches above normal for yearly rainfall, and an inch above last year. Lake Superior is 20 inches above the level shown on navigation charts, and is about nine inches above an average July level. The lake gained four inches during the past month, but now is expected to be stable. All that data means that there’s been a lot of water coming down this summer.

It is supposed to dry off in the next week or so, so it will be time to get out and enjoy our nice full lakes. Make sure to bring your PFD’s when loading your boat, and even better, wear them. Even if you are a strong swimmer, wearing a PFD can make it a lot easier to try to right a swamped canoe, and to gather floating packs of gear. If you’re planning a Boundary Waters trip and have never tipped a canoe over, we recommend that you try it in safe conditions before you go. It may be a lot harder than you think to right the boat and get back into it. When canoeing, it is good to bring some sort of bailing equipment and tie it to the boat. While it is possible to flip a canoe upright in a way which leaves little water in the boat, it takes practice. It is also a lot easier on a calm lake, and face it, if you tip your canoe, it isn’t going to be on a calm lake. It is tempting to tie your packs into the canoe so they would stay with the boat if you tip it, but don’t. Packs tied to the canoe can make it very difficult to right the boat. If you pack using plastic bag liners, packs will usually float and the contents remain dry for some time.  Concentrate on getting your boat upright first, and getting yourself in the boat, then start worrying about your stuff. You could get hypothermic or drown, but the pack with your fishing gear and extra sweatshirt is going to be just fine swimming in the water for a while. But…the best way to right a boat is to not tip it in the first place. Pay attention to the weather, and don’t travel on days with high winds and rough water which are beyond your ability. When planning your trip, include the possibility of being weathered in for a day. It is better to spend an extra day in camp than to end up going for an unintentional swim.

On your way to the lake, there is some logging traffic to consider. On the Tofte District, there will be trucks on Trapper’s Lake Road, Lake County 705, Cook County 33, the Sawbill Trail, and The Grade. On the Gunflint end, hauling is taking place on Greenwood Road, Firebox Road, Shoe Lake Road, the Gunflint Trail, Forest Road 1385, and the Trestle Pine Road.

As the weather clears, head out to a lake and have fun, but keep boating safety in mind. Until next week, this has been Joe Mundell with the National Forest Update. 
 

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