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North Shore Weekend

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  • Saturday 7-10am
Genre: 
Variety
Host CJ Heithoff brings you this Saturday morning show, created at the request of WTIP listeners.  North Shore Weekend features three hours of community information, features, interviews, and music. It's truly a great way to start your weekend on the North Shore. Arts, cultural and history features on WTIP’s North Shore Weekend are made possible with funding from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

 

 


What's On:
Gunflint Lake July 2007 (Dale Sundstrom/ Flickr)

Wildersmith on the Gunflint: July 15

The Northland is turning the corner in July with weekend number three going into the books. Border country has experienced some swell atmospheric conditions as I hit the keyboard with this Gunflint scoop. With temperate air, cooling breezes and mostly sunny skies, it has made for some great dock time, including last weekend.  

Dock time for yours truly affords a terrific opportunity for contemplation. Following another week of American tragedy, there has been much to think about. Solving our ever growing societal dilemmas seems overwhelming to nearly impossible. As greed and self-gratification continue not yielding an inch toward compromise and/or respect for our fellow man, it’s just pretty discouraging for a country that once prided itself in being a land of opportunity for all.                                               

It sure makes me thankful for living in our “unorganized territory” where peace and civility are still the order of life.

On a happier note, while down on the dock last Sunday, when not pondering American ills, I was nudged back to the reality of how great this place is by rolling lake waters with gentle whitecaps and shadows being cast on the Canadian hillside by puffy clouds. The world seemed at peace, as one roller meshed into another and the heavenly wisps of gauze slowly eased over the green mountain tops to be gone forever. We in this neck of the woods are so fortunate to reside far away from the hubbub of an urban America gone wild, in spite of the constant media bombardment. 

Ongoing news from the upper Trail has me reporting about berries, bitin’ bugs and bunnies. First up is the progress of blueberry ripening. A few pickers are hitting the patches and gathering early purple pearls. However, most reports indicate the best is yet to come, probably in another week or two.      

As to the bug situation, black flies have simmered down a bit, but still can be stirred up. “No see umms” remain a nightly nuisance if lighted windows are left open, and mosquitoes are lurking in mass as the sun sets. Knowing how these winged terrorists get after we humans, one has to feel for the critters of the woods that must be in 24/7 agony from these carnivorous nippers.  

Meanwhile, snowshoe hares are practicing multiplication exercises with diligence. The hopping crowd can be noted at almost any turn of the road. I can’t remember observing so many during any one season as I’m seeing this summer, and other folks are echoing similar information. This speaks well for critters seeking a rabbit dinner, especially Canadian lynx. We might look for increased lynx appearances as fall and winter grow closer.  

Elsewhere out this way, the ghostly reminders of the Ham Lake fire are diminishing in many areas bit by bit. A recent trip to end of the Trail, finds far fewer of the charred skeletal remains lurking over the landscape. One might guess the wind storms of a few weekends ago took down great numbers and buried them in the surging green rebirth.    

While driving any number of our back country roads, I’m often compelled to visit with myself about the traveled surface. I have taken to doing an assessment of quality verses appalling on those I traverse. 

I find many county maintained pathways to be in a difficult to deplorable state. At the same time, I realize this is a huge county with many arteries to be serviced, and understand the difficulty in keeping each road up to snuff and everyone happy. 

Nevertheless, my mid-summer rating finds the Sag Lake Trail to be far and away “the clubhouse leader” in regard to rattle your teeth roughness. I feel for those folks having to make daily trips on this rolling corduroy course. Number two on my list, and gaining on the Sag Lake Trail, is county number twenty (the South Gunflint lake Road). In both cases, I hope I’m not offending residents residing along these back woods byways, but rough is rough, and pot holes, wash-boards and ruts, are what they are!   

Our big Gunflint canoe race event is now at hand. Finally, after months of planning, canoeists will hit the water this coming Wednesday evening. Kids' activities begin at 4:00 pm, food service at 4:30, and the first race at 6:00, all on the Gunflint Lodge waterfront. Expect to have another great evening in canoe country as we celebrate summer and the Gunflint Trail Volunteer fire Department.   

Last but not least, from this weekly commentary volunteer, thanks once again for stepping up with a pledge of support in last week's WTIP summer membership drive. All station followers proudly confirmed their friendship, showing that “with a little help from our friends,” anything is possible.

This is Fred Smith, on the Trail, at Wildersmith, hoping sanity and peace can get a grip on our violent world!
 

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Trout fishing, same time, next year...

West End News: July 14

The theme for this year’s exhibit at the Cross River Heritage Center in Schroeder is “Boom Town to Ghost Town: Taconite Harbor.” In keeping with the theme, the Schroeder Area Historical Society is convening a panel of former Taconite Harbor residents and workers that includes Bud Buckman, Gary Hansen, Charlie Nelson, Charlie Tice and Steve Quaife.  It is a great pleasure to have all of these experienced and respected men together to discuss the fascinating history of Tac Harbor. The panel discussion is at the Cross River Heritage Center in Schroeder on Saturday, July 16, at 11 a.m.  All are welcome and I’ll be surprised if cookies and coffee are not served.
 
On the same Saturday, July 16, the new North Shore Winery and Sawtooth Mountain Cider House are celebrating their grand opening with wine and cider tasting, tours, neighborly visiting and live music. The winery is just a little way up the Ski Hill Road in Lutsen on the right hand side. The celebration runs from 2 until 5 p.m., so it’s the perfect destination after catching the Taconite Harbor panel in Schroeder. Be there, or be square.
 
The U.S. Forest Service has scheduled a listening session to collect public opinion about the renewal of public mineral leases for the proposed Twin Metals copper-nickel mine near Ely. The session is scheduled from 5 until 7:30 p.m. at the Ely Memorial High School in Ely.
 
The issue at stake is a little arcane, as it revolves around the renewal of expired public mineral leases that were purchased by Twin Metals’ predecessor in the 1960s. The leases have been renewed more-or-less automatically in the past. The original leases were purchased before the passage of federal laws that protect water, air and land against industrial pollution.
 
The Twin Metals mining project abuts immediately up to the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness and water flows downhill from the proposed mine into Voyageurs National Park and Quetico Park in Canada. If built, it would be the largest mine in the history of North America.
 
The long and short of it is that the mining company has captured the hearts of most local political leadership up to and including the Congressional level. However, the vast majority of Minnesotans, including a solid majority of the people in northeastern Minnesota, strongly oppose the mine.
 
The pros and cons of large scale sulfide mining aside, Twin Metals presents a very interesting political situation where many of our elected leaders whole-heartedly support the mining, while the majority of their constituents do not. This says a lot about modern American politics and begs the question of just whom our elected officials feel beholden to.
 
It is fair to say that a significant minority of Minnesotans do support the mine, usually citing the jobs that it will create. On the other hand, much evidence points to the job creation being counter productive and unsustainable over the long term.
 
In any case, I urge everyone to educate themselves on this crucial issue and make your opinion known to the Forest Service and your elected officials at all levels of government. The very nature of our region hinges on it.
 
There is a famous play and movie called “Same Time, Next Year.”  It tells the story of a couple who carry on an intimate relationship for a few days each year for 26 years. I have had this same kind of relationship for going on for nearly 40 years. The big difference is that my annual liaison is not an affair, but a trout fishing date.
 
My friend, Dale Kauffman, has been staying at the Baker Lake campground since 1955. He remembers the first year because his family traveled from Iowa in their brand new 1955 Chevy station wagon.
 
At some point in dim history, Dale and I began trout fishing the same stretch of a local river for a single day each year. Other than an occasional phone call around the holidays, our relationship has been based on this singular annual event. 
 
After Dale married, his wife, Priscilla, joined us on our visit to the stream. Priscilla liked to fish, but she didn’t like to trout fish for some reason, so she would sit on the riverbank and write poetry while Dale and I enticed brook trout with our size “OO” Mepps spinners.
 
Sadly, Priscilla suddenly and unexpectedly passed away a few years ago, but Dale and I have fished on. The bond between the three of us had become so strong that I was invited to participate in the spreading of Priscilla’s ashes near her favorite campsite. After the ashes were spread, Dale and I went trout fishing, with Priscilla never far from our minds.
 
Although our friendship goes back more than 40 years, we’ve only spent a few dozen days together. But, I treasure Dale’s friendship and the memory of Priscilla as much as anything in my life – well, except maybe for his corny jokes. This week, Dale and I will be back on the river, and with the good Lord willing, we’ll be back there --- same time, next year.
 

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A Year in the Wilderness: July 12 - Day 285

Cook County adventurers Dave and Amy Freeman are spending a year in the wilderness. On a regular basis they’ll be sharing some of their experiences traveling the BWCAW.

(Photo courtesy of Dave and Amy's Facebook page)

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Sunny's Back Yard: Taking a walk

Sunny has lived off-grid in rural Lake County for the past 18 years and is a regular commentator on WTIP. Here she shares the benefits of taking a walk - especially in a natural setting - in Sunny's Back Yard.

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Northern Sky: July 9 - 22

Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column.

Corona Borealis, the Northern Crown; Scorpius, low in the south, near Mars and Saturn; and big Jupiter news: NASA's Juno entered Jupiter's orbit.

(photo: High Heels by THOR/Flickr)  Tune in to Deane's audio to learn more about Jupiter and find out why this is an appropriate photo.

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Loon with fish, courtesy of Chik-Wauk

Wildersmith on the Gunflint: July 8

We’re a full week into month seven and the upper Trail weather is much less frightful than the previous two weekend segments. In fact, our National Birthday holiday was splendid for both Gunflint residents and visitors.

Rapidly as the days tick away it seems unnerving we are closing down July’s second weekend so soon. I’ve even heard comment to the effect that summer is over after Independence Day. This is a bit of a stretch, but then again we are only a three short weeks away from August as this scoop hits the air.

This in mind, the calendar for area folks is plenty full of summer activities. First up and highly important is the current membership drive for WTIP. At broadcast time, the station is into the third full day of its drive for membership support, with only two and one-half days remaining (until noon Monday).

WTIP needs you! Please get on board without delay. Give operators a call at (218) 387-1070 or 1(800) 473-9847, or click and join at WTIP.org – or better yet – stop by 1712 West Highway 61, hand deliver your pledge and see our staff and volunteers in person.

Next up is the fortieth year for the Gunflint Trail Canoe Races, scheduled for Wednesday, July 20, with food service beginning at 4:30 pm and races at 6:00. Plan to be there for all the fun on the waterfront at Gunflint Lodge.

Remember proceeds from this great community event go to support our Gunflint Trail Volunteer Fire Department and EMS crew. Tickets for the general prize raffle and the kayak drawing are on sale now at Trail Center and any number of places along the Trail. They can also be bought on site the evening of the event.

As we get into August, the mid-Trail gang will be following up with their annual flea market, gift boutique and auction, also on behalf of our Gunflint protectors. Stay tuned to WTIP for more details on the August 10 happening which runs from 1:00 to 4:00 pm.

Like windrowed snow in winter, daisies are drifting in along our byway Trail sides. Thus they join our 60 mile “Technicolor” wildflower garden. It’s uncanny how “Mother Nature” has sequenced blooming things out this way. The floral show is just a mosaic of pigments.

A note on the loon chicks at the Chik-Wauk site, finds all is going well. They hatched on June 28-29. However, the big wind/rain storm of last weekend disturbed the parents enough causing them to move from the nesting platform to the bay southwest of the Museum. This new location, along the Moccasin Lane hiking trail, is actually more accessible for photo-ops than the birthing place.

A couple big Bull Moose sightings, in different locales on the Trail, have been reported. Being several miles apart, I presume they are two different characters, and this is heartening.

Further moose lore comes from a couple gals over on Leo Lake. I’m told they are seeing more moose this summer than in several years past. It was also shared that the ladies are in a challenge contest over who observes the most. To date one has seen 15 while the other has counted seven. It makes me wonder if they are counting the same critters time after time. Too bad the animals couldn’t be marked with a dab of paint for confirming ID’s. In any event, to see just one is great, and these ladies’ scorecards are fantastic. Maybe their sightings indicate a turn-around in the territory's moose population decline.

On a final note, a friend reports the observance of three young Pileated woodpeckers. I’m told the trio was found hanging out on the USFS leased land properties at the west end of Gunflint Lake. Guess the “woody woodpecker” look-alikes were making a lot of racket, perhaps calling for mom and pop who were nowhere to be seen and probably tired of the adolescent chatter.

This is Fred Smith, on the Trail at Wildersmith, encouraging your call to arms for WTIP!

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Dr. Tiffany Wolf and Dr. Seth Moore

Dr. Seth Moore: Partnership with University of Minnesota looks at Grand Portage ecosystem health

Dr. Seth Moore is Director of Biology and Environment with the Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Chippewa. 

The Grand Portage Reservation is located in the extreme northeast corner of Minnesota, on the North Shore of Lake Superior in Cook County. Bordered on the north by Canada, on the south and east by Lake Superior and on the west by Grand Portage State Forest, the reservation encompasses an historic fur trade site on scenic Grand Portage Bay.

The band engages in fisheries and wildlife research projects throughout the year, working with moose, wolves, fish, deer, grouse, and environmental issues. Dr. Moore appears regularly on WTIP North Shore Community Radio, talking about the band's current and ongoing natural resource projects, as well as other environmental and health related issues. 

In this segment, Dr. Moore talks about a partnership with the University of Minnesota taking a closer look at the health of the Grand Portage area’s ecosystem.

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Jill Doerfler

Anishinaabe Way: "Those Who Belong" with author Jill Doerfler

The book "Those Who Belong: Identity, Family, Blood, and Citizenship among the White Earth Anishinaabeg" by UMD Professor Jill Doerfler, recently won the 2015 Midwest Independent Publishing Association Award for History. In this segment, Professor Doerfler gives a brief history of blood quantum as it relates to membership in the MN Chippewa Tribe, and describes recent efforts by some White Earth tribal members to create constitutional reform on that reservation, including a change from the 1/4 blood quantum required by the MN Chippewa Tribe (MCT) to a system that honors family lineage as the basis for citizenship at White Earth.

(Photo courtesy of Jill Doerfler)
 

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Yellow hawkweed (Lmmahood /Wikimedia Commons)

Wildersmith on the Gunflint: July 1

Ten days into official summer and we welcome July. It’s hard to believe, we have reached the month of the Ojibwe 2016 “halfway” moon.

The last weekend of June found this area once again in the bad weather bullseye. As luck would have it, “Mother Nature” spared us a repeat of the previous week's blitz. This time the violence skirted us in other directions.                                                                                                        
This neighborhood did get a nice rain of nearly an inch last Saturday while most folks kept their eyes on the sky under a full day of severe weather advisories. All of us residents are thankful to have not experienced more blowdown as we continue the current clean-up efforts.  
             
Speaking of the June 19 storm damage, some parts of the territory look like nothing happened, while many other spots were smashed pretty well. The Wildersmith place took a hit with seven big trees down, while neighbors to the west and east were hit even worse.             
                       
It seems residents on the Mile O Pine and east along the south shore of Gunflint Lake caught the brunt. Sadly, I mention many one to 200 year old white pines were downed in addition to countless other species. Further, I’m told the popular “campers island” was about totally smashed. As far as I can tell structure damage seems limited to docks, boats and boat lifts.                                                                                                                                              
All of this weather terror is making me long for winter when a good dose of cold and snow would look like pie and ice cream compared to what we’ve had lately.                                                          

On a brighter note, temperatures have been just right to allow for garden plantings to explode. While on the wild side, a burst of gold has taken over along the Trail. The plethora of buttercups, Canadian hawkweed and other yellow beings has laid claim as the guide through this paradise pathway to the end at Seagull Lake. Added to a sprinkling of orange hawkweed, daisies and waning lupine, and we have a rainbow right here at ground level. It would seem a trip on the Trail would be in order.                                       
Speaking of Trail treks, The Gunflint Trail Historical Society is hosting an open house this coming Sunday, July 3, in honor of the new Nature Center facility on the Chik-Wauk Museum campus. The happening occurs from 11 am to 4 pm with free admission and treats for all.    
                                                                                                                                                                
As part of the celebration, the GTHS is excited to announce two recent exhibit additions. The beautiful “Diving Loons” sculpture is now in place. This work was designed and produced by local artist, Keith Morris. Besides the loon display, the Nature Center has been gifted with a marvelous display of Trail butterflies, skippers and moths. This collection has been provided by local lepidopterist, David MacLean. Grateful thanks go out to both gentlemen for their elegant contributions. 

It is unknown if other area folks are noticing a scarcity of hummingbirds this summer. Our usually busy nectar station is experiencing almost no activity. Over the past couple weeks the only hummer arrival has been a singleton. The mini bird arrives shortly after daylight commences, and that’s all we’re seeing. Kind of makes me wonder what human invasiveness has done now to screw up more wild country habitat.          
                                                                                                             
On the angling agenda, a few area fishermen indicate their catching has gone to pot. They are thinking the big storm has driven fish down and stirred up other bait sources. They’re just not into being lured by hooks with meat attached for the time being. However, a fellow on Gunflint Lake tells of watching a gull (often referred to as a winged French fry-eating rat) having better luck than he. It seems the “gull’ snatched an eelpout from somewhere nearby and stopped by his dock where it set down to have its version of a “shore lunch.”                                                                                                                                                                      
The angler headed in soon after his observation and came up dockside of the dining bird. Not to be denied dinner, the winged critter was reluctant to take flight. The fisherman eventually had to shoo it off, and placed a lawn chair over the finny in order to discourage a return.  In the end, an eagle eyeing the goings-on circled overhead, made a careful landing, and made off with an easy dinner. This is yet another predator/prey epic in the natural magic of life on the Gunflint Trail.                                                       
A note of “breaking news” comes to all WTIP listeners and website followers. Our summer membership drive begins in earnest this coming Wednesday, July 6, and continues through noon, Monday, July 11.                                                                                           
One of three such drives each year, this is the biggest and is so important for continued growth of this North Shore Community broadcast experience. I encourage all to re-up their membership and /or become a new member of the WTIP team during this coming effort.    
                
I think we can all say we got to where we are to today “with a little help from some special friend.” At this time, “with a little help from all WTIP friends” radio excellence can blossom even further. Be sure to give us a call or click and join at WTP.org or stop by 1712 West Highway 61 and pledge your support, beginning next Wednesday.                                                                                                                                            
This is Fred Smith, on the Trail, at Wildersmith reporting! Have a safe and sane July 4.                             
 

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LSProject: Why do we love Lake Superior?

Lake Superior is a big part of the landscape in northeastern Minnesota…and it has special meaning for most visitors and residents. In this edition of WTIP’s ongoing series, The Lake Superior Project, producer Martha Marnocha heard from several people with their thoughts on this huge freshwater lake.

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