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North Shore Morning

AM Community Calendar/photo by masochismtango on Flickr

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News and information, interviews, weather, upcoming events, music, school news, and many special features. North Shore Morning includes our popular trivia question - Pop Quiz! The North Shore Morning program is the place to connect with the people, culture and events of our region!

 


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Sawtooth Mountain Elementary School

School News from Sawtooth Mountain Elementary: May 18

Sofi, General and Ruby report the latest school news.

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West End News: May 18

The Forest Service took advantage of the recent wet weather and completed a couple of prescribed burns that have been on their to-do list for a little while. One burn was in our neck of the woods, just off The Grade road, otherwise known as Forest Road 170. This fire was used in timber harvest units where logging activities have been taking place. The prescribed fire was used as the method to consume residual slash from the timber sale and to remove hazardous fuels. It also served to prepare the area for seeding and planting, and restored fire to the ecosystem. This particular area hasn’t seen a wildfire in modern history, so what the agency is doing to help manage our Forest ecosystem is much, much needed. We drove by the burn while it was in progress, and the many firefighters on site appeared relaxed, which we were glad to see.

Coming up this weekend on May 20 is the Superior Trail Races in Lutsen. These races are for the foolhardy who enjoy running 25 or 50 kilometers through extremely hilly, rugged and technical out and back trails traversing the Sawtooth Mountain Range on the Superior Hiking Trail. The course parallels Lake Superior, climbs up to nearly 2000 foot heights, crosses rivers and streams - all while meandering through our boreal forest. The races start 7 and 8 a.m. on Saturday, and will be finished by 4 p.m. Which seems impossible. But I guess if you are familiar with the ultra-running world this doesn’t surprise you.

Spectators are welcome to visit the Oberg and Sawbill aid stations in Tofte. Please though, no parking in the trailhead parking lots. There will be signs and volunteers to direct you to safe parking areas at both locations. The races will begin and end at Caribou Highlands in Lutsen. There is a 4 p.m. finish cutoff time, after which is a free post-race event with food served. So come on down to cheer on some crazy runners.

If you’re one of the lucky few who gets some time off during Memorial Day weekend, be sure to check out the Art Along the Lake event. Various galleries and businesses along the North Shore from Schroeder to Grand Portage will be hosting demonstrations and events next weekend, Friday, May 26 through Sunday, May 28. Of particular interest in the West End, the Cross River Heritage Center in Schroeder will be hosting demonstrations by Mary Jane Huggins, Kathy West, Orlene Fisher and many more starting at 10 a.m. on Friday and Saturday. Kah Nee Tah Gallery in Lutsen will have demonstrations in precious metal clay and silver and raku with Judy Christensen and Maggie Anderson at 11 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Kah Nee Tah has also recently had an update to the interior of their second gallery so if you haven’t been in a while, now is a great time to stop in. Other participating west end art stops worth a visit are the Last Chance Studio and Gallery in Lutsen and the Thompsonite Beach Jewelry Shop between Lutsen and Grand Marais.

If like me you don't get the holiday weekends off, I hope you will take some time for your own trail run or art. Maybe don't play with fire, though.

For WTIP, I’m Clare Shirley with the West End News.

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Bloodroot

North Woods Naturalist: At long last spring

Spring is definitely making itself known. WTIP’s Jay Andersen talks with naturalist Chel Anderson about spring sneaking into the Northland.

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Io

Northern Sky: May 13 - 26

Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column.

One of Jupiter's moons, Io, is the site of a powerful volcano. Saturn starts to be bright in the night sky, and on May 13-14, a bright moon follows close behind Saturn. In the middle of June, Saturn will be visible throughout the night.

Photo is courtesy of NASA/University of Minnesota

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Moon and Tree.jpg

Wildersmith on the Gunflint: May 12

Our spring in the upper Gunflint looks to be back on track. The “May Day” snow and cold has given way to barren earth as we’ve been privy to some glorious days since we last met on the radio. While a few man-made piles of winter can still be seen in shaded spots along back country roads, one has to think the cold season stuff is now in the rear view mirror.

In spite of the ground still being cool, the full “Budding Flower” Ojibwe moon shone down on us a couple nights ago foretelling of things to come.

In concert, our master gardener, “Mother Nature,” has wild green shoots piercing through forest duff where the warmth of “old Sol” has offered inviting warmth. On a similar note, spires of the forest are finally showing green bud tips. In the meantime, domestic planters along the Trail remain anxiously waiting for an end to possible frosty mornings so they can get their hands in the dirt and do some sowing.

The upper Trail was abuzz last weekend, and looks to display more of the same with this segment, too. The Byway will come alive with anglers behind the wheel and watercraft in tow. It’s the annual rite of fish season opening. While fishing is always great, the catching sometimes is not, nevertheless, walleyes beware, here they come!                                                                                                         

It would seem this weekend is the true beginning of vacation season regardless of school not being out. So we’re off into the hub-bub of warm season activities. Good luck to all, be sane and safe, the water is still dangerously cold, and be mindful of fire danger as we await green-up in this wild territory.                                                                                                                           

Remembering what wild fire can do, the Gunflint community did just that this last weekend. Some 250 community residents, friends and visitors gathered for a commemoration of survival and rebirth on the 10th anniversary date of the Ham Lake fire.                      

Ten years seems like a long time, but those moments in 2007 remain as vivid as if it were yesterday in the minds of folks who endured that historic happening.                                                                                   

This day, ten years later, was glorious, with rippling Seagull Lake waters nearby; crystal blue, smokeless skies and bright new coniferous green showing as far as the eye could see. Emotions ran the gamut as those in attendance reflected on tragedy, and now triumph. It was truly a day to honor the spirit of mankind, more specifically the enduring soul of this Gunflint community.                                                        

Heartfelt thanks go out to the organizing committee, the sponsoring Gunflint Trail Volunteer Fire Department, the Gunflint Trail Historical Society and the wonderful support agencies in attendance that were there for us in our times of terror a decade ago.                    

Oddly enough, ten years ago this week many of us resident evacuees were just being allowed to return to our wilderness places. In the same instance, many of our friends and neighbors did not have a place left for which a return was possible. Everyone lauds their spirit and courage to put life in Gunflint Territory back on track.                                                                                                            

History is all about remembering what brought us to this point on life’s journey. Attendees remember sadness and at the same time, rejoiced in our community’s energy to move forward, hoping to never experience such horror again.                                                                    

With hats, jackets and gloves still the mode of outdoor apparel for we two-legged beings, some of the “wild neighborhood” critters are into shedding their winter coats. I’ve observed a few fox and one of our resident pine martens in their molting ritual. Actually they looked pretty scruffy and unkempt. Getting prepared for hot days ahead, their plush winter attire is deplorable. I wonder, if when they meet their kin--do they give thought to how bad the other looks?                                                                                                                                  

More sounds of the season continue to delight. One such is that of those peepers. Heard a chorus of those aqua folk in a swampy area a few days ago and boy, did they ever seem to be in harmony with spring coming alive.                                                                                              

On a not so delightful note, reconnaissance squadrons of buzzing biters are out and about. I’ve been tempted to don the bug net a time or two as they’ve already given me a couple warning nips. I know frosty times are about over, but the winged terrorists presently have me thinking about autumns’ assistance (kind of sad isn’t it?)                                                                                                                                                  

For WTIP, this is Fred Smith, on the Trail at Wildersmith, where every day is great, in spite of bugs biting and perhaps, the fish not!

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Great Expectations School

School News from Great Expectations: May 12

Mary June and Lola report the latest school news.

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Superior National Forest Update: May 12

Hi. I’m Paulette Anholm, with this week’s edition of the National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the Tofte and Gunflint Districts of the Forest. For the week of May 12, here’s what’s going on in the Forest.

We’ve turned on the water systems in all the campgrounds on our two districts. We’re waiting for the water samples to be checked to make sure things are okay, but unless there are unforeseen problems, all our fee campgrounds should have water and garbage pick-up this weekend, and also begin charging fees for camping. It promises to be a great weekend, so we’re hoping you get a chance to go camping and maybe drop a line in the water for the walleye opener this Saturday.

Speaking of fishing, and who isn’t, we’d like to remind everyone about aquatic invasive species. Don’t move invasives around! Make sure to drain all water from live wells and bait containers, thoroughly wash your boat and trailer, and dry it before you change your fishing spot. Dispose of bait in a way that will insure that it won’t survive. While it is the law, and you could be fined for transporting exotic species, the more important reason to do this is that it will help preserve our lakes and our native fish. It can be a pain to completely wash off a trailer, but you really owe it to everyone else fishing, and to the next generation of people fishing, to do your part to help keep exotic invasives under control.

Out of the water, the land is getting drier. Fire danger might actually be in the high range this weekend because as yet we have little green-up happening, and an escaped fire could grow quickly in dried grasses and leaf litter. If you are cooking your fish on shore, use only designated campfire rings, and fuel your fire with small wood, only as big as your wrist. This will make it easier to extinguish the fire later. Before you leave, double-check that your fire is cold to the touch.

Speaking of fire, we’d like to note the 10th anniversary of the Ham Lake Fire at the end of the Gunflint Trail. This very large fire was remembered at an event at the Gunflint Community Center last weekend in a celebration of community. While we wouldn’t like to see a fire like that again, it was wonderful to see all our friends and neighbors from the Gunflint Trail celebrating the spirit that really makes this a special place to live and work. At the event, the Forest Service unveiled a new interpretive sign which will be installed at the Gunflint Lake overlook. Next time you’re up the trail, check it out.

This drier weather does make it possible for us to continue to conduct our prescribed burns. Fire crews have done several burns recently to help maintain wildlife openings, and are now doing burns which will help prepare areas which have been logged for the planting of new trees. There are three of these scheduled for this weekend, so people may notice smoke, and may encounter fire crews on the ground during the prescribed burns. Information on the location of these fires will be posted on Boreal. If you see smoke, and are not sure if it is from a prescribed fire, go ahead and report it. It is always better to be safe than sorry when it comes to fire.

While the Forest is drying out, the roads are still too wet for the spring weight limits to be removed. This means that there are no large logging trucks on the roads, but there are still soft spots and washouts to look out for.

That’s all for this week! Enjoy the weather, the forest, and with luck, the fish! Until next week, this has been Paulette Anholm with the National Forest Update.

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West End News: May 11

Clare Shirley's West End News is a weekly feature on WTIP. Clare is a fifth-generation local, and third-generation canoe outfitter from Cook County's West End.

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Sawtooth Mountain Elementary School

School News from Sawtooth Mountain Elementary: May 11

Katie and Tighe report the latest school news.

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Gus' Wild Side: Biting bugs

In this edition of Gus' Wild Side, we'll hear about biting bugs - a negative aspect of our brief northwoods spring and summer seasons.

Gus’ Wild Side is a regular feature on WTIP. Gus writes about our connections to Nature as he explores wildness from the High Arctic to his own backyard along the North Shore of Lake Superior.

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