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North Shore Morning

AM Community Calendar/photo by masochismtango on Flickr

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News & Information

News and information, interviews, weather, upcoming events, music, school news, and many special features. North Shore Morning includes our popular trivia question - Pop Quiz! The North Shore Morning program is the place to connect with the people, culture and events of our region!

 


What's On:
Hamlet (Kevin T Houle /Flikr)

Memorization Made Easy, April 22 & 23

Rose Arrowsmith Decoux and Jackson Nickolay share the details of their upcoming class with North Shore Morning host Matthew Brown.  
More information and registration with Sue at 387-1284, extension 2 on online.

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Superior National Forest Update: April 17

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Hi.  I’m Brie Schueller, fire management specialist on the Superior National Forest, with this week’s edition of the National Forest Update -  information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the Tofte and Gunflint Districts of the Forest. For the week of April 17, here’s what’s going on around the Forest.
Currently, roads are fairly clear of snow and ice, but they are still pretty soggy from the meltwater.  County road restrictions due to the soft roads have stopped most timber hauling operations on the Forest.  Some cutting of timber is still going on, but the work is mostly within the units and doesn’t involve hauling on the roads.  That means that these spring days are nice for exploring the Forest without having to be too concerned with large truck traffic.  You do have to be concerned with the same road conditions that have kept the trucks off the roads.  Soft shoulders and mud are the obvious problems, but a recent drive showed just how alert you need to be while driving.  On that short drive, in two spots, trees whose roots had loosened in the soft soil had blown over across the road.  In other spots, the road had sunk sufficiently to create an area that was less a bump and more of a jump ramp.  Drive with care, road conditions vary greatly and hazards appear with very little forewarning this time of year.
If you are looking for early camping, you need to know that while snow is off most major roadways, many smaller camping areas still have snow over campsites and access roads.  Camping is possible, but in the spring before our fee season begins, campers will not have water or garbage pick-up in campgrounds, and outhouses may not be accessible.  The fee season begins when the water systems can be turned on, usually around mid-May.
Spring migrant birds are coming through in larger numbers each day.  Juncos, vultures, robins, and grackles are just a few of the birds that have arrived over the past two weeks.  Red winged blackbirds are calling in the Twin Cities, but I have yet to hear one up here.  Bears are awake and walking about.  People who are feeding the migrating birds need to make sure to bring in bird feeders and store bird food securely so they don’t end up feeding the bears.  The best way to deal with bear encounters is to avoid them in the first place by making sure food, garbage, and other attractants are not where bears can get them.
It is the mud season, and the spring bird season, but it is also the spring fire season.  Conditions remain dry throughout Minnesota and multiple red flag warnings have been issued this week in our area.  A red flag warning is issued when there are weather conditions that can cause extreme fire behavior.  These conditions include a combination of strong winds, low relative humidity, and warm temperatures.  On these red flag days, people need to be extremely careful with fire.  Most people are not aware of it, but there have already been multiple small fires on the Superior this spring, and most of these were somehow ignited by human activity.  You may not think of fire danger because you can still see some patches of snow in the woods, but open areas with brown dry grass will readily carry fire.  There are many of these areas along the Lake Superior shoreline.  During spring, as the last of the snow melts and before the trees green up, is a prime time for fire, particularly in the absence of rain.  Our fire personnel, along with state DNR and local firefighters, will be monitoring conditions closely, but it is up to you to help by reporting any possible fires to 911, and by preventing any accidental ignitions.  Right now, the Superior National Forest has firefighters and engines assisting the Chippewa National Forest to the west in their firefighting efforts but we also have crews on standby locally, just in case. 
Enjoy our spring weather, and until next week, this has been Brie Schueller with the National Forest Update.
 


 

Molly Thomas heads to Down Under Sports: special event April 18th

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Family and friends of Molly Thomas are hosting a special event; it’s a fundraiser to help Molly travel to Australia for the Down Under Sports Tournament.  All are invited to the Grand Marais Art Colony Saturday April 18th for music, treats, a silent auction and more.  WTIP volunteer Yvonne Mills spoke with Molly and Leah Thomas on North Shore Morning. 
 

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Syrian refugees' camp in Cappadocia, Turkey (Fablo Sola Penna / Flikr)

Great Decisions meeting: Syria's Refugee Crisis, April 16th

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­­­­­­­­­ The current Syrian military conflict is a perfect storm for the suffering of civilians caught in the cross-fire.  North Shore Morning host Mark Abrahamson learns more about this month’s Great Decisions meeting and topic from this month's discussion leader Henry Berman.
 
Henry Berman is a business retiree from Ecolab in St Paul.  He has a passionate interest in International Relations, especially the Middle East.  He has family who lives in the Region and he has traveled there seven times since 2008.  He is a frequent Great Decisions Speaker, presenting in recent years on the US-Israeli Relationship and Egypt and the Arab Spring.  His topic of interest this year is the Syrian Refugee Crisis.

Great Decisions meets the 3rd Thursday of the month at the Cook County Community Center from noon to 1:30pm.  More information from Diane at 387-3015.


 
(R!E / Flikr)

The Wisdom of Dark Emotions

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Gina Dixon is Licensed Psychologist and Grief Therapist with Essentia Health.  She spoke recently about 'the wisdom of dark emotions' with WTIP's Veronica Weadock.

St. Mary’s Grief Support Services has resources for living with and through grief and loss.

St. Mary’s Grief Support Services
407 East Third Street
Duluth, MN 55805 
218-786-4402

 

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Lighthouse Beacon in Grand Marais (Steve Dumire /Flikr)

Cook County Community Fund grant applications: letters of intent due April 15

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Deadlines are approaching for this year’s grant cycle of the Cook County Community Fund.  WTIP volunteer Julie Carlson spoke with Kaitlyn Bohlin of the Cook County Community Fund on North Shore Morning.

Letters of intent (due April 15) and applications (due May 1) are now submitted online.
 

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Superior National Forest Update: April 3

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Hi.  I’m Amy Wilfahrt, wildlife biologist on the Superior National Forest, with this week’s edition of the National Forest Update  -  information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the Tofte and Gunflint Districts of the Forest. For the week of April 3, here’s what’s going on around the Forest.
If you are headed out to enjoy a last ski in the winter woods, you may have waited a bit too long.  There is still some snow out there, but there isn’t a lot and what is there is going away pretty fast.  But, if you are planning on paddling anywhere, you’ll have to wait a bit longer.  There is still a lot of ice on the lakes – over two feet on many of them.  It is softening though, and you will have to be careful if you are venturing out on the ice.  It is not very predictable this time of year.
If you are out driving, there are a couple of logging operations going on.  One is off Forest Road 170 on the road to Wilson Lake and another on the Trapper’s Lake Road near Isabella on the Tofte District.  On the Gunflint side, there is one operation off the Greenwood Lake.  Due to the spring thaw making gravel road beds mushy, the county and Forest have imposed load limits on roads which means that even with these logging operations, there is not much in the way of truck traffic right now.  So, you don’t have to watch for large trucks as much, but you do have to watch for washouts, crumbling shoulders, and water over the road. 
Many of the roads that were not plowed during the winter are still impassable due to snow, ice, or soft roadbeds.  Plowed roads have been thawing and refreezing, and may be icy in spots.  One small advantage of our dry spring is we’ve had virtually no washouts this year, but be aware that some roads are very mushy in low spots.  When in doubt, get out and check before driving over suspiciously soggy spots.
Those dry conditions may make for good spring driving, but it also makes the forest ripe for fires.  Until the thunderstorm season starts, virtually all spring fires on the forest are started by people.  That means that despite the dry conditions, we can avoid wild fires, if we choose to.   If you are using fire, be very careful this spring to make sure that it is controlled.  We’ve had some really windy days, and the combination of low humidity, lack of rain, and high winds mean that what normally would be a safe fire could easily get away from you.  While snow cover makes for little fire danger in some areas, the shore of Lake Superior is actually at critical fire danger this weekend.  On the west side of the Forest, the snow is gone and there has already been one eleven acre wild grass fire.  On our east side, let’s see if we can have zero human caused wild fires this year.
Out in the woods, wildlife is noticing the spring.  Robins have shown up in the area, and eagles are sitting on hatching eggs or nestlings.  Melting snow banks on the road sides have exposed the winter’s accumulation of dead deer, and crows, ravens, and eagles are gathered to enjoy the feast, creating a uniquely north woods traffic hazard.  Where else do you need to brake for low flying eagles?
Enjoy our spring weather, and until next week, this has been Amy Wilfahrt with the National Forest Update.
 


 

Child Protection in Cook County

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Child protection is a community effort, and locally we have the support of Cook County Public Health and Human Services.  WTIP’s Veronica Weadock spoke with Social Services Supervisor Grace Bushard and Child Protection Social Worker Heidi Akins of PHHS.   Concerns about a child's safety or wellbeing can be reported at 387-3620.

Cook County Public Health & Human Services
411 W Second Street
Grand Marais, MN 55604
(218) 387-3602

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Venus (J. Gabas Esteban /Flikr)

Northern Sky: March 21

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Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column.

The end of Mars, a waxing moon, a bright Venus with its runaway greenhouse effect; and a total lunar eclipse on April 4th after moon set.


 
Cross River (Matt Becker /Flikr)

Schroeder Township elections and annual meeting update

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The Schroeder Township Board held their annual meeting and elections on March 10. WTIP volunteerJulie Carlson spoke with Schroeder Township Deputy Clerk Gale Ring on North Shore Morning. 

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