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North Shore Morning

AM Community Calendar/photo by masochismtango on Flickr

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News & Information

News and information, interviews, weather, upcoming events, music, school news, and many special features. North Shore Morning includes our popular trivia question - Pop Quiz! The North Shore Morning program is the place to connect with the people, culture and events of our region!

 


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Great Expectations School News Oct 27

School News from Great Expectations School with Sammy and Bridgette.

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School News - Sawtooth Elementary October 17 2017

School News from Sawtooth Elementary with Amber, Natalie and Greta.
October 17, 2017

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Bird Migration

North Woods Naturalist: High flying birds

On an average day birds fly around 500 or so feet high. During migration they climb a lot higher…a lot higher than we mammals could ever hope to survive.

WTIP’s Jay Andersen talks with North Woods Naturalist Chel Anderson about high flying birds.
 

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Leaves on the Ground

North Woods Naturalist: Autumn winding down

There are a number of indications that autumn is in full swing, maybe even turning the corner.

WTIP’s Jay Andersen talks with North Woods Naturalist Chel Anderson about autumn winding down.

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Superior National Forest Update October 20

National Forest Update – October 19, 2017.
Hi.  I’m Sandee Nazhad, customer service representative, with this week’s National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the east end of the Superior. Here’s what’s happening for the week of October 20th.

Despite our warm spell, the Forest continues to move onwards toward winter in many ways.  Leaves are past what most people might think of as peak, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t still beautiful out there.  In addition to the remaining yellow aspen and birch, the tamaracks are wonderfully golden right now, and the leaves on the ground add scent and sound to the fall forest. 

Hunters are one of the other signs of winter’s approach.  We are in the middle of both grouse season and archery season for deer.  Additionally, many deer hunters are scouting the woods in preparation for rifle season and may be starting to put up temporary deer stands and sight-in their guns.  It’s the time of year when you need to be sure to be wearing orange whether you are a hunter or not, and practicing safe firearms handling if you are carrying or using a weapon.  Of course, people aren’t the only things out in the woods.  We’ve had a couple of crews come across moose recently, sometimes a bit closer than expected.  Moose can be a bit crabby this time of year, and if you do happen on one in the brush, it’s not the season to be approaching closely.  Just back out slowly until you are at a safe distance before you start taking pictures.

Flour Lake Campground will still have water available from the nearby lodge for this weekend, but otherwise all the campgrounds have their water systems shut off and are in a ‘non-fee’ status.  You can still camp there, but you’ll have to bring your own water and haul out your garbage.  We also stop resupplying outhouses in the fall, so you may want to pack your own paper, just in case.  Docks are also being pulled from boat accesses, and will be out of most lakes by the end of this week.

Fire crews will be burning slash piles this month as conditions allow.  These piles are being monitored as they burn.  Our relatively wet summer has given us low fire danger most of the time, but there have been a couple of recent ‘red flag days’ just to the west of us.  With green leaves off the trees now, it doesn’t take but a few days of dry winds and low humidity to raise the fire danger.  If you are planning on burning this fall, make sure to get a proper permit, and also apply common sense to your local conditions.  Don’t burn if it just seems like a bad idea.

While I hate to see Christmas items at stores when Halloween hasn’t even happened, there is a little Christmas in the air as some people have started to harvest balsam boughs for wreaths already.  If you are doing this, check at a Forest Service office for required permits, and remember that you need to be at least 50 feet off any roadside, trail, lake shore, or recreation area when you are cutting.

There is truck traffic out there this week.  Much of it is in the same areas as the last few weeks.  Hauling on Gunflint is taking place on the following roads: Firebox Road, Blueberry Road, Greenwood Road, Shoe Lake Road, Forest Road 1385, the Gunflint Trail, South Brule Road, Lima Grade, Trestle Pine Road, Ball Club Road, and Devil Track Road.   Tofte logging traffic will be on the Pancore Road, Sawbill Trail, Dumbbell River Road, Wanless Road, Lake County 7 and 705, the 4 Mile Grade, The Grade, Perent Lake Road, Trappers Lake Road, Temperance River Road, and the Six Hundred Road.  There will also be gravel hauling between Sawbill and Toohey Lake  where they will be taking gravel from the Dog Tired Pit off the Sawbill Trail to an area about 2 miles south of The Grade.

Afternoon thundershowers are predicted for Saturday so make sure to do your vacuuming and cleaning then because Sunday and most of next week look great to be outside in the woods.  And who wants to vacuum on a nice day?  Until next week, this has been Sandee Nazhad with the National Forest Update.
 

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Wildersmith on the Gunflint October 20

October 20, 2017     Wildersmith on the Gunflint     by     Fred Smith
Our northern forest has pretty much shed its autumnal coat. The deciduous tree scene is largely gray, scraggily skeletons, lurking amongst their evergreen cousins. The last vestige of descending things will be laid to rest by this airing as Tamarack gold layers up on the landscape.

Fitting for the advance of ghost and goblin time, an eerie quiet hangs over the landscape during the time we mourn the death of summer leaves and the mosaic of falls’ last hurrah. With the growth of our wildland world taking its final bow, the long stillness of winter is waiting in anticipation as “Mother Nature will soon be issuing a first “winter watch.”

Several frosty mornings of late are setting the stage, and days of clouds hang cold and heavy over border country. It goes without saying these billows of heavenly drab might soon deliver moisture of frozen character. Anecdotally, I observed the first skim of ice on a bird water dish and on a Trailside pond last Tuesday morning.
                                                                                                                                                                                     Meanwhile, around the Wildersmith place, “getting ready” chores are about complete, so the “wizard of winter wonder” can bring it on. My last dip in the lake, to retrieve wildfire sprinkler hoses, found the liquid in the low fifties, a real attention grabber.                                                                                                                                                                                          
In the past few days, I’ve started placing a little daytime sustenance out on the deck side feed trough. Our first returnees, those “whiskey jacks” and blue jays, were joined last Monday by an infrequent visitor of ebony character. We seldom have ravens land here, although they are often rapping overhead. So getting to see one up real close was a treat. Guess some fatty meat scraps were more than this dapper corvine could resist, prompting the fast food stop-over.
                                                                                                                     
A couple reported a busy beaver along the Trail just days ago. This critter of former fur trade notoriety was engaged in laying up cold season vittles. “Bucky” was so engrossed in dragging a fresh aspen branch across the black-top it failed to look before crossing. The gnawing herbivore narrowly missed becoming a “road-kill’ statistic as the attentive driver braked just in time allowing this paddle tail varmint another chance on life.  
The incident happened in the area just above the observation pull-off at the Laurentian Divide where a roadside pond accommodates beaver lodging, and is also the home of Beaver & Beaver Construction. So if locals are driving through this area, be on the watch to give this guy/gal a break.                                                                                                                                                                                  
Speaking of another chance on life, a number of stately young red pines had theirs literally cut short. They were destroyed in a recent nature trail slashing occurrence along the Seagull River in the upper Gunflint region. Whether the episode was a case of vandalism or an ill-advised, un-supervised agency endeavor, it is tragically dis-heartening.

These were trees planted by volunteers following the Ham Lake fire during the Gunflint Green-up efforts of 2008, 9 and 10. Just getting their roots firmly established, after nearly ten years, many were eight to ten foot tall. Hopefully, those responsible can be found and held accountable for their actions.

 “Moose Madness” throughout the county this weekend holds hope for some candid Alces Alces appearances. Although the north land icons don’t take well to public appearances, this would be the right time that a few might step out of seclusion and show off a little bit of Trail legacy. Its’ Minnesota Education Association weekend and visitors by the hundreds will cruise the Byway, searching, in hope of catching a glimpse from “moose-dom.” Good luck and happy viewing to all!

By the way, while moose searching, it will be the last chance for a visit to the Chik-Wauk Museum and Nature Center up at Trails end. The historical facility will close its doors for the season at the end of the day Sunday. The Gunflint Trail Historical Society thanks the thousands of visitors for coming this season. 

Everyone is invited back, come next spring, as two new facilities will be taking shape around the campus. These additions will be first hand history in the making as the GTHS builds to share more of the Gunflint Trail story.

For WTIP, this is Fred Smith, on the Trail, at Wildersmith, where every day is great, no matter what the season!

 

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Wildersmith on the Gunflint October 20

October 20, 2017     Wildersmith on the Gunflint     by     Fred Smith
Our northern forest has pretty much shed its autumnal coat. The deciduous tree scene is largely gray, scraggily skeletons, lurking amongst their evergreen cousins. The last vestige of descending things will be laid to rest by this airing as Tamarack gold layers up on the landscape.

Fitting for the advance of ghost and goblin time, an eerie quiet hangs over the landscape during the time we mourn the death of summer leaves and the mosaic of falls’ last hurrah. With the growth of our wildland world taking its final bow, the long stillness of winter is waiting in anticipation as “Mother Nature will soon be issuing a first “winter watch.”

Several frosty mornings of late are setting the stage, and days of clouds hang cold and heavy over border country. It goes without saying these billows of heavenly drab might soon deliver moisture of frozen character. Anecdotally, I observed the first skim of ice on a bird water dish and on a Trailside pond last Tuesday morning.
                                                                                                                                                                                      Meanwhile, around the Wildersmith place, “getting ready” chores are about complete, so the “wizard of winter wonder” can bring it on. My last dip in the lake, to retrieve wildfire sprinkler hoses, found the liquid in the low fifties, a real attention grabber.                                                                                                                                                                                          
In the past few days, I’ve started placing a little daytime sustenance out on the deck side feed trough. Our first returnees, those “whiskey jacks” and blue jays, were joined last Monday by an infrequent visitor of ebony character. We seldom have ravens land here, although they are often rapping overhead. So getting to see one up real close was a treat. Guess some fatty meat scraps were more than this dapper corvine could resist, prompting the fast food stop-over.
                                                                                                                     
A couple reported a busy beaver along the Trail just days ago. This critter of former fur trade notoriety was engaged in laying up cold season vittles. “Bucky” was so engrossed in dragging a fresh aspen branch across the black-top it failed to look before crossing. The gnawing herbivore narrowly missed becoming a “road-kill’ statistic as the attentive driver braked just in time allowing this paddle tail varmint another chance on life.  
The incident happened in the area just above the observation pull-off at the Laurentian Divide where a roadside pond accommodates beaver lodging, and is also the home of Beaver & Beaver Construction. So if locals are driving through this area, be on the watch to give this guy/gal a break.                                                                                                                                                                                  
Speaking of another chance on life, a number of stately young red pines had theirs literally cut short. They were destroyed in a recent nature trail slashing occurrence along the Seagull River in the upper Gunflint region. Whether the episode was a case of vandalism or an ill-advised, un-supervised agency endeavor, it is tragically dis-heartening.

These were trees planted by volunteers following the Ham Lake fire during the Gunflint Green-up efforts of 2008, 9 and 10. Just getting their roots firmly established, after nearly ten years, many were eight to ten foot tall. Hopefully, those responsible can be found and held accountable for their actions.

 “Moose Madness” throughout the county this weekend holds hope for some candid Alces Alces appearances. Although the north land icons don’t take well to public appearances, this would be the right time that a few might step out of seclusion and show off a little bit of Trail legacy. Its’ Minnesota Education Association weekend and visitors by the hundreds will cruise the Byway, searching, in hope of catching a glimpse from “moose-dom.” Good luck and happy viewing to all!

By the way, while moose searching, it will be the last chance for a visit to the Chik-Wauk Museum and Nature Center up at Trails end. The historical facility will close its doors for the season at the end of the day Sunday. The Gunflint Trail Historical Society thanks the thousands of visitors for coming this season. 

Everyone is invited back, come next spring, as two new facilities will be taking shape around the campus. These additions will be first hand history in the making as the GTHS builds to share more of the Gunflint Trail story.

For WTIP, this is Fred Smith, on the Trail, at Wildersmith, where every day is great, no matter what the season!

 

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Northern Sky: Oct 14 - 28

Northern Sky:  Oct 14-28 2017

Deane  Morrison is a science writer at the University  of Minnesota.
 
She authors the Minnesota Starwatch column, and in this feature
she shares what there is to see in the night sky in our region.

Deane Morrison’s column “Minnesota Starwatch” can be
found on the University of Minnesota website at   astro dot umn.edu.
          

 

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Wildersmith on the Gunflint October 13

WTIP News     October 13, 2017     Wildersmith on the Gunflint     by     Fred Smith
I can’t believe the days could go by any faster either here or anywhere. We Gunflinters are nearing the half-way point of month ten as the tourist season is slowing to a crawl.   

Weather over the past seven has remained moderate and somewhat dry in the upper Trail region. In spite of a frosty spot here and there, the area has escaped a killing freeze up to this weeks’ news release.

 We could easily be lulled to sleep on this issue, but it’s going to happen, so we year around folk had better be getting those outdoor water facilities prepared. Of special note is the winterization of the wildfire sprinkler systems.

 Since we last met on the radio, yours truly has scratched a few chores off my winterizing list. The snow blade has been mounted and a snow blower check started on the first pull so my check-offs are dwindling. One more trip into the cool lake will bring in the sprinkler system lines and the biggest tasks will be history.   
 
Our color extravaganza is starting to become distant in the rear view mirror. Showers of leaves have been the order over the past few days, and Tamarak needles are gaining their golden glow rapidly.                                                                                                                                     
Speaking of autumnal views, each day provides an expanding opportunity to see through “the forest for the trees.” One often takes for granted wildland things seen in the woods until the leaves are on and the foliage hides them away. Well, the time has come back to us with thinning gold tokens, opening up for a renewed slant on things once hidden, but now revealed.                                                                                                                                                                                       
This time of year is never more magic than when one treks down a back country road. With the greedy world about to consume us, it is soul soothing to stroll or drive down one of these off Trail Gunflint roads.      
                                                                                                                                 
A damp earth fragrance, a leaf strewn path, a calm breeze, a sky of blue sharing both sunshine and puffy clouds, occasional avian tweets, drumming grouse, and squirrels scrambling here and there are blended with the serenity of almost zero civilization hubbub. Thus, we observers are charmed with a formula for the idyllic life experience. That’s the way it is with sights and sounds of October in Gunflint country.   
                                                                                                                                                                         
On these cool nights, good reading is a must as we hunker down by the wood stove. Recently, I came across an intriguing article in the fall edition of INTERNATIONAL WOLF magazine. I would think anyone concerned that indigenous lives matter might share my interest in this article focusing on the relationship between the Anishinaabe (Original Man) and Ma’iingan (the wolf) in a creation story.                                                                                                                                                                     
Author, Tovar Cerulli, reflects on the direction of wolf management in the eyes of the Ojibwe through a unique spiritual and cultural understanding of the wolf. I am no professional critic, but I recommend this thought-provoking selection. Chase it down in your local library or perhaps find it on line at internationalwolf@wolf .org.

So many bruin stories continue flowing in I can “bearly” keep up. Two instances of larcenous bear activity have occurred in this neighborhood within recent days.  
  
The first report came from a gal up the hill from Wildersmith telling about finding her car door ajar, only to open it fully and have a young bear jump out. The next night, “Bruno” came back and opened the vehicle door again, climbed in and did some real damage while sniffing and scrounging for some kind of treat.  
   
Then in another semi breaking and entering episode; I believe it to be a bear, got into my barbeque storage bin and made off with a pair of blue hot material gloves. Seems funny this nosing around has never happened before, as these gloves have been in that unit for years. I’m guessing the critter might have sniffed an air of cooking grease on the gloves and decided they were for the taking.    

An interesting fact is the gloves were heavy duty leather welding gloves, and if consumed it must have been a chewing good time. Funnier yet, how about the bear passing a little leather, neighbors might keep an eye out for a blue calling card that is definitely not of blueberry consumption. 
      
On a final note, a couple AWOL “whiskey jacks” (Canadian Jays) have returned from summers’ wherever. These camp robbers are busy every day in a re-education of us Smith’s to be out at the feed trough promptly with a treat. My how trainable we have become!    
                         
For WTIP, this is Fred Smith, on the Trail at Wildersmith, where every day is great, as we await winter to round the bend!
 
 

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